My workplace has recently been bringing me down (which you can see a bit of in other things I’ve published in the last couple of weeks). I wasn’t satisfied with this, so I took a look at what was bothering me, what I was struggling with and what I could control and change to resolve some of these issues. The disrespect and behaviour of my students was one of the issues I identified, so I decided that I needed to make a more concentrated effort to manage behaviour and address student work ethic. …


I am missing the creativity in the teaching and learning that I create. I often find myself asking, “Where is the fun?” as I read through the tasks I have to use for assessment. Even when I present ideas, my coordinators seem to find the most boring way to interpret the idea, to the point where I no longer recognise the suggestions I have made. Their approach is very prescriptive and limits what students complete in their learning. …


Report season is coming and a fresh, new season of abuse from parents approaches. I will soon be contacted by many parents asking, “Why did my child get a ‘D’? Why didn’t you say something earlier so that they could have done better?” In this school, I have to give consequences to students who do not complete their classwork or homework, and I have to contact home. To do this every day means that I would be contacting approximately one hundred parents a day, either via email or phone. It is the school’s policy to keep parents up to date…


Art by @alustrations on Instagram

Following the Holocaust leading up to and during World War II, in which approximately six million Jews were exterminated, a number of things occurred to try and stop further genocides (the word genocide was created in 1941). The Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights were presented at the United Nations General Assembly in 1948. Despite the recognition of human rights and the crime of genocide, we continue to witness violations and crimes against humanity across the world.


It has taken me weeks, but I have finally figured out what I have been struggling with in my new workplace. The feedback I get for my lesson and assessment ideas are that, “They won’t work,” or “The students won’t be able to do that”. But it is not only that. When my suggestions are modified or edited, they become watered down and reflect a lot of lower-order thinking skills with black-and-white answers. The creativity, critical-thinking and open-endedness of the learning suggested becomes something completely different.

This is not all that seems to be happening in the approaches my colleagues…


Recently, parents have been opposing content that they perceive to be in the most recent Religious Education curriculum introduced by the Diocese of Parramatta. Their concern is that the curriculum is infringing on their right and duty as the primary educators of their children. (I have addressed some of the content that these parents, and politicians, take issue with in other articles I have written to dispel misconceptions around the curriculum.) …


Driving home at the end of another day in which I felt that I made few gains in my fight to challenge the habits of my entrenched colleges, I was caught up in my annoyance from a conversation I had with my coordinator. He is a good man who has been teaching for probably fifty years. We clash a fair bit because his view of what he thinks students are capable of is quite small and my view is more like, “the sky’s the limit”. Today was another one of those ‘polite’ clashes.

As I played the conversation over in…


The nature of inquiry learning encourages students to develop their inquiry skills; their understanding of topics and how to evaluate sources and synthesise knowledge into comprehensive and practical ways. This inquiry focus within learning means that the way curriculums are written includes inquiry questions. Supporting the teaching and learning around these questions are resources, textbooks and websites for teachers and students to access that support all of them to access and explore content.

The Diocese of Parramatta, its Bishop and leaders in Religious Education have been criticised for the ‘culture of inquiry’ in its curriculum along with supposedly teaching non-Catholic…


All that the Catholic Church teaches about human love and sexuality comes from this truth: that God, who is love, created all people in his image — male and female he created them — to share his love and therefore to reflect his love in the world and in their lives (USCCB).

Continuing in my crusade to inform people about the teachings of the Catholic Church in response to growing fundamentalist and conservative abuse towards those with modern approaches to Religious Education, I’m going to discuss the unit I am currently teaching to my Year 10s in the the Diocese…


Recently, the Catholic Diocese I am a part of introduced a new Religious Education Curriculum. It is honestly one of the most forward-thinking, innovative and realistic curriculum’s for this subject that I have ever seen — I think it is great and has so much potential to engage students in the Catholic faith. However, the Bishop who commissioned it and the leaders of Catholic Education in this Diocese have become the targets of harassment and abuse as conservatives label it as the work of the ‘anti-Christ’.

I, as someone teaching this new curriculum want to address some of the mistaken…

Mary Kolbe

A high school teacher challenging the system and fighting injustices.

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